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Andaman Islands

 

The Andaman & Nicobar Archipelago is a collection of more than 500 remote islands, part of a submarine mountain range extending from Myanmar to Sumatra dividing the Bay of Bengal from the Andaman Sea.  The Andamans themselves consist of 204 islands of which only 26 are inhabited; inaccesibility and the ensuing extraordinarily extensive cover of natural vegetation affording considerable protection to the species found therein.

 

29 species of bird are endemic or near-endemic to the Andamans and Nicobars together, evolved here as a result of sheer isolation, making this one of the most significant Endemic Bird Areas in Asia.  Of these endemics, 20 occur in the rainforest and mangroves of the more accessible islands of the Andaman chain, South Andaman and Havelock.  These endemics form part of a rich and interesting avifauna, incorporating a number of species more commonly associated with Southeast Asia than India accompanied by seasonal passage migrants. 

 

The Andamans are a tropical idyll with azure waters, wide, palm-fringed sandy beaches and a comfortable tropical maritime climate.  The islands are fringed by one of the world's richest coral reef ecosystems, with opportunities to explore their magnificent marine life.

 


 Andaman Serpent Eagle

Endemics of the Western Ghats & the Andaman Islands

Tour Code: SI001/AI002 / 18 days

A thorough exploration of two of India's most important Endemic Bird Areas, providing the chance of all endemic or near-endemic birds (28 and 20 respectively) of southern India's Western Ghats and the remote Andaman Islands.

Dollarbird

Endemics of the Andaman Islands

Tour Code: AI001 / 9 days

The Andamans are a tropical island idyll, of interest to birders for their 20 easily accessible endemic and near-endemic species, part of an interesting avifauna combining species with Indian affinities with those more usually associated with Southeast Asia.